Here is the second story. This should not be displayed in the primary news slot. Again borrowed from www.metro.co.uk


Intelligence and education are being bred out of the human gene pool, according to a new study.

Researchers from deCODE, a genetics firm in Iceland, found that the genes that make people predisposed to spending more years in education became rarer in the country between 1910 and 1975.

At the same time, the presence of more ‘education genes’ in a person means they are likely to have fewer, if any, children.

As a result, scientists proposed that the education genes had become rarer precisely because well educated people had contributed less to the gene pool.

And this wasn’t just because better educated people decided to have children later to focus on their careers, given greater career opportunities. The study found that even those who left the education system early had fewer children than others.

The deCODE laboratories in Iceland (Picture: Getty Images)
The deCODE laboratories in Iceland (Picture: Getty Images)

But Dr Kari Stefansson, the study leader, doesn’t believe this spells bad news for humans.

‘In spite of the negative selection against these sequence variations, education levels have been increasing for decades,’ he said.

‘Indeed, we control the environment in which these genetic factors play out: the education system. If we continue to improve the availability and quality of educational opportunities, we will presumably continue to improve the educational level of society as a whole.

‘Time will tell whether the decline of the genetic propensity for education will have a notable impact on human society.’

So essentially, both our education levels and the number of children we have are socially-determined – so much so that it overrides the genetic factors.

As long as we strive to provide the best quality of education for as many people as possible, humanity will be fine.